REMARKS

Since in my own mind many of these posts have been "chapters," I'm splitting some of them out to separate blogs. But also, my audience is divided and quite different, one part from another. Many have dropped out and many have newly arrived. There are recognizable paper "book" versions of some of the posts that fit together.

I find that some people still assume that a blog is a sort of diary. This one is not. It is not for children, either in terms of subject or writing style. It's not written "down." Think academic magazine or column without footnotes.


SOCIAL MEDIA

My name shows up on google+ and twitter, but I only monitor and will not add you. I do NOT do Facebook though someone with the same name does. Please use plain email. My phone landline is in the phone book. I have no cell phone.

Other Blogs by me

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR INFORMATION ABOUT THE ART OF BOB SCRIVER, PLEASE GO TO: www.scriverart.blogspot.com.

Notes from Alvina Krause between 1957-1961 are posted at www.Krausenotes.blogspot.com


TWO REBLOGS:
Fiction about Indians at www.willowsticks.blogspot.com
Essays about Indians at www.siksikaskinitsiman.blogspot.com



Tuesday, August 15, 2006

"TWELVE BLACKFEET STORIES" by Mary Scriver

Now available from http://www.lulu.com:

TWELVE BLACKFEET STORIES
by Mary Scriver
Description: Roughly twelve generations of Blackfeet Indians have existed since 1776 until now. Here are twelve loosely linked stories, one for each of those generations. These are about Amskapi Pikuni people, the Montana subdivision.
Purchase Date: 14-Aug-2006
Format: Download (698 kb) Get Adobe Reader

Also available from the same source as a soft backed book in the dimension of 8.5x11. It’s about 100 pages long, so if you download and print out the cost will be a bit less, but you won’t have a bound cover.

If demand justifies it, I’ll prepare a deluxe version with a hardback cover and illustrations of the artifacts mentioned in the stories.

These stories are written at a level that even young high school students could read and enjoy, but the subject matter might take some discussion. A “two-spirited” person, for instance, is a man who decides to live as a woman in woman’s clothes. A “cutnose” woman is one who has been punished for infidelity by having her nose cut off.

The stories would be excellent resources for someone teaching Blackfeet history. A time-line is included at the back of the book. The detail is as accurate as I could get it from being around here since 1961 and reading just about everything in print. But they are acts of imagination and I am a white woman, so take that into account.

My fondest hope is that Blackfeet will say to themselves, “Heck, I could write like that!” and then do it.

These are the stories and their time periods.

Dogwoman (1742 - 1766)
An old woman protests that dogs were
good enough for the ancestors.


Eats Alone (1767 - 1791
A chief has everything but confidence
in the Sacred.


Two Medicine (1792 - 1821)
A young two-spirited man falls in love with
a little blonde priest, thinking he is also a man in a dress.

Horse Healer (1821 - 1841)
A woman warrior is captured and taken over
the Continental Divide.


Horizon (1843 - 1859)
An exploring Indian goes back East
and is mistaken for an insane person.

Eclipse (1860 - 1882)
A priest and a doctor puzzle over
what to do with an old dead woman.

Whiteout (1883 - 1900)
An abusive wolfer is killed by his
woman and her niece.

Cutnose Woman (1901 - 1924)
A woman unjustly punished for being
unfaithful finds happiness unexpectedly.


Gay Paree (1924 - 1953)
Three Blackfeet soldiers accidentally
meet in Paris at the end of WWII.

Basketball Warrior (1953 - 1969)
A young athlete goes off to fight at
Wounded Knee but never makes it.


Sweetgrass Hills (1969 - 1991)
A young man takes his Vision Quest
in the Sweetgrass Hills.


The Sun Comes Up (1992 - now)
A female Blackfeet Fish & Game warden
picks up a Blackfeet man who has never
seen the reservation.

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